Saturday, March 23, 2019

Links & Auctions

- Barbara Basbanes Richter highlights the current exhibition of items from Lisa Baskin's collection at Duke for the Fine Books Blog: see also the excellent online version of the exhibition.

- Over at Echoes from the Vault, Leah Humenuck reports on a brief conservation survey of books in the St. Andrews collections.

- There's a new post on the BL's Endangered Archives blog about the recent digitization of the Barbados Mercury.

- Julie Fisher writes for the Omohundro Institute blog on "Accessing the Past: Why Paleography Skills Still Matter."

- Christoph Irmscher has a new essay for Public Domain Review: "Audubon's Haiti."

- John Williams wrote a short "tour" of the recent New York Antiquarian Book Fair for the NYTimes, which is accompanied by some very nice photographs.

- The Grolier Club has acquired an important collection related to the later (and projected) editions of Jacques-Charles Brunet's Manuel de libraire.

Review

- Margaret Leslie Davis' The Lost Gutenberg; review by Gabino Iglesias for NPR.

Auctions

- Books and Manuscripts & Autographs at Koller Auctions (Zurich) on 26 March.

- Fine Books, Manuscripts, Atlases & Historical Photographs at Bonhams London on 27 March.

- Autographed Documents, Manuscripts, Photos, Books & Relics at University Archives on 27 March.

- Printed & Manuscript African-Americana at Swann Galleries on 28 March.

- Books & Illustrated Art, including Cartoons at Chiswick Auctions on 28 March.

- Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper at Forum Auctions on 28 March.

- Fine Judaica: Printed Books, Manuscripts & Maps at Kestenbaum & Company on 28 March.

- Rare Books and Manuscripts at Addison & Sarova on 30 March.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Links & Auctions

Home after a great trip to Eugene for the Society of Early Americanists conference and then to New York for various bookish things, including the three book fairs last weekend. The ILAB symposium on provenance, theft, and forgery was excellent, and I will be sure to share the videos as soon as they are posted. I also had the great pleasure of seeing the exhibition of miniature books at the Grolier Club, curated by my friends Pat Pistner and Jan Storm van Leeuwen. If you can get to New York before 19 May, do be sure and visit the Grolier Club and see their show. But don't take my word for it: Sarah Lyall covered the exhibition for the NYTimes on 7 March.

Next up, the Virginia Antiquarian Book Fair in Richmond, 5–7 April.

- An interesting pair of articles in the spring issue of the UVA magazine, both by S. Richard Gard, Jr.: one on the upcoming renovation of Alderman Library, and one on the still-unsolved 1970s thefts of rare books, manuscripts, and a Poe daguerreotype.

- Over at Sammelband, from Kate Ozment, "What does it mean to teach a feminist book history?" And I highly recommend the @GrubStreetWomen Twitter feed: they're tweeting historical profiles of women working in biblio-areas each day in March. 

- Adam Hooks and Zach Lesser have launched their Shakespeare Census, to track individual copies of Shakespeare's works printed through 1700 (excluding the folios). Censuses are vital: please help if you can.

- Peggy McGlone writes for the WaPo about planned renovations to the Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress.

- Oak Knoll Press and the British Library have published a major new edition of David Pearson's Provenance Research in Book History; orders are now being accepted. Also available via Oak Knoll, the catalogues of both the miniature books exhibition noted above and of Five Hundred Years of Women's Work, the exhibition of Lisa Baskin's collection at Duke. I got a look at all three last weekend, and can confirm you'll want to add this trio to your bookshelves.

- Several theft/missing reports: sacramental records from Saint Dominic's Church in San Francisco (stolen from the parish offices); a William Osler letter (see photo); and Walter Crane's copy of an 1894 edition of Canterbury Tales with sixteen painted miniatures (missing in transit from New York to Maryland).

- "CBS Sunday Morning" highlighted Kentucky's Larkspur Press and the American Academy of Bookbinding last weekend.

- USTC is preparing to relaunch on a new platform shortly: check out the beta version.

- Entries for the 2019 National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest are now being accepted.

- In the Concord Monitor, "Archivist warns state records at risk in digital age."

- Over at Manuscript Road Trip, "A Little Bit of Voynich on the Side."

- Daniel Greene has been named the new President and Librarian of the Newberry Library.

- Alison Flood for the Guardian reports on the recent identification of a 15th-century Irish manuscript translation of Avicenna, used as a binding on a 1530s book (see images).

- Caroline Duroselle-Melish writes for The Collation on the scope of the STC.

- Over on Steamboats are Ruining Everything, "On disappearing bookstores" (see also, J Oliver Conroy's Guardian piece "Why are New York's bookstore disappearing?").

- Winnie Hu writes for the NYTimes about "how the NYPL fills its shelves."

- New from IFLA, the results of a survey about using RDA for cataloging rare materials.

- Hebrew University of Jerusalem has displayed a number of Einstein manuscripts, most of which are previously unpublished.

Upcoming Auctions

Photographica at Chiswick Auctions on 19 March.

- Éditions Originales du XIXe au XXie Siècle at ALDE on 20 March.

- Autographs at Swann Galleries on 21 March.

- Fine Literature at PBA Galleries on 21 March.

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Links & Auctions

- There's a preview of the New York Antiquarian Book Fair over on the ABAA blog. On the same weekend, don't miss the New York City Book and Ephemera Fair (Saturday and Sunday), and the Manhattan Vintage Book & Ephemera Fair/Fine Press Book Fair (Saturday). Plus there are lots of auctions and exhibition talks and other things going on around New York during the week. I'm looking forward to the fairs and to the ILAB symposium earlier in the week. Before that, though, I'm off to Eugene, OR for the biennial meeting of the Society of Early Americanists, where I'll be giving a short talk on one of my old favorites, William Jenks' Memoir of the Northern Kingdom. I'll post a version of that talk here once I get home.

- Now online, the "Legally Binding" exhibition from the Yale Law Library.

- The Boston Athenaeum has announced an expansion into an adjoining building; this follows hot on the heels of the announcement that Elizabeth Barker will leave as director at the end of March.

- From Sarah Zhang in the Atlantic, "The Lab Discovering DNA in Old Books."

- Sarah Werner's Lieberman Lecture, "Working Towards a Feminist History of Printing" is now available on YouTube.

- The third Honey & Wax Book Collecting Prize is now open for entries, which will be due before 1 June 2019.

- Gabrielle Dudley is in the "Bright Young Librarians" spotlight this week.

- The B.H. Breslauer Foundation has announced a $25,000 investment in the ILAB Breslauer Foundation Prize fund.

- A unique Caxton fragment from the Sarum Ordinal has been identified at the University of Reading.

- In Apollo, Melanie Gerlis asks "Have printed auction catalogues had their day?"

Upcoming Auctions

- Ornithology, Zoology & Voyages at Chiswick Auctions on 27 February.

- Autographed Documents, Manuscripts, Books & Relics at University Archives on 27 February.

- Autographs & Memorabilia at Chiswick Auctions on 28 February.

La Collection de M. Gaulard, Première Partie at Rossini on 5 March.

Rare Books, Featuring the Otto Penzler Collection of Mystery Fiction, Part I at Heritage Auctions on 6 March.

Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 6 March.

- Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books at Swann Galleries on 7 March.

- Fine Books: A Biblio-Medley for All Tastes at PBA Galleries on 7 March.

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Links & Reviews

Aside from the ensuing jet-lag, it was lovely to be out in Oakland again for the California International Antiquarian Book Fair last weekend.

- There's a good look-back at the fair over on the Tavistock Books blog.

- At least twenty rare books were stolen from Baldwin's Book Barn in Chester County, Pennsylvania last weekend.

- Dave Gary has an excellent piece on the APS blog about what we can learn from the early circulation records of the Society.

- Oliver Stead writes for the National Library of New Zealand's blog about the recent digitization of an album of watercolors by George Raper (1769–1797) in the Alexander Turnbull Library.

- Ben Schmidt has a useful caution to anyone still trying to use Google Books as a research tool in "How badly is Google Books Search broken, and why?"

- John Mark Tillman, who was sentenced in 2013 to nine years in prison for various thefts from Canadian libraries, archives, and museums, has died. He was granted parole in 2016.

- Peter Libbey writes for the NYTimes about the grand Tolkien exhibition now on display at the Morgan (very much looking forward to seeing this show in March).

- A wonderful rubricator's complaint over at Notabilia.

- Over on the N-YHS blog, a really great photograph of the 1925 solar eclipse.

- The BL's Medieval Manuscripts blog explores the different writing systems found in early Anglo-Saxon England.

- Michael Dirda looks through a few of the works released into the public domain this year.

Review

- Susan Orlean's The Library Book; review by Kathryn Hughes in the Guardian.

Upcoming Auctions

- Winter Auction at Alexander Historical Auctions on 18 February.

- Antiquarian and Collectors' Books at Toovey's on 19 February.

- Bibliothèque d'un Amateur at Pierre Bergé & Associés on 19 February.

- Prints and Maps at Toovey's on 20 February.

- Bibliothèque Marc Litzler at Christie's Paris on 20 February.

- Americana – Travel & Exploration – Hawaii – World History – Cartography at PBA Galleries on 21 February.

- Livres Anciens & Modernes – Manuscrits & Autographes at Aguttes on 22 February.

Saturday, February 02, 2019

Links & Reviews

Bibliography Week last week, the California International Antiquarian Book Fair next weekend. There's a preview over on the ABAA blog. Hope to see some of you there!

- Shelly Bradbury reports for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that defense attorneys for the librarian and bookseller charged with thefts from Pittsburgh's Carnegie Library are asking prosecutors to specify the date on which each of the 321 books was stolen, reportedly to "allow them to consider statute of limitations and alibi defenses."

- A great find at Bristol Central Library: manuscript waste from a copy of the Vulgate Cycle with mentions of Merlin and other Arthurian characters, used in bindings. More from the Guardian.

- Sarah Werner will be speaking at the Columbia Book History Colloquium on 13 February on "Old Books as Digital Objects."

- Kate Ozment has a new Sammelband post, "Roundup of Materials: Teaching Book History."

- Alison Flood for the Guardian: "Hold the front pages: meet the endpaper enthusiasts."

- The Bodleian Library has acquired a fifteenth-century French Gothic book coffer.

- Among February's Rare Book Monthly articles, Michael Stillman analyzes the 2018 auction prices, and Bruce McKinney reports on Christina Geiger's appointment as head of rare books and manuscripts at Christie's New York and on Richard Ramer's fiftieth-anniversary catalog.

- Over on the Library of Congress blog, Carla Hayden talked to Mark Dimunation and John Hessler about the LC's copy of Galileo's Sidereus Nuncius.

- Harvard's Houghton Library has acquired the remainder of John Ashbery's papers, as well as his 5,000-volume library. More in the NYTimes.

- Geraldine Fabrikant profiles Bauman Rare Books for the NYTimes.

- Don Skemer on the Princeton RBSC blog, "Recovering Lost Manuscript Evidence."

- "Errors in Bookplate Design" at Confessions of a Bookplate Junkie.

- From Aaron Pratt over on the HRC blog, "Collated & Perfect," on the publication and program series being organized jointly by HRC and the Beinecke.

- The Boston Globe highlights the recent expansion of the Massachusetts State Archives.

- Over on the BBC, "The Library of Forbidden Books."

- At medievalbooks, Erik Kwakkel on "The Oldest Surviving Printed Advertisement in English."

- Miriam Intrator was featured in "Bright Young Librarians."

- The Irish Times reports on the recent digitization by Trinity College Dublin of the fourteenth-century Dublin Apocalypse.

- Pyewacket Books on selling books, but not at book fairs.

- Over on the Penn Special Collections Processing blog, Liz Broadwell on "An Uncommon Proof."

Reviews

- Diane Setterfield's Once Upon a River; review by Laura Miller in the Guardian.

- John Martin Robinson's The Travellers Club; review by A. N. Wilson in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Travel and Exploration at Bonhams London on 6 February.

- Modern Literature & Illustrated Books (online) at Forum Auctions on 7 February.

- The Book Fair Century: One Hundred Fine Books, Plus Books Sold to Benefit the ABAA Benevolent Fund at PBA Galleries on 7 February.

- Printed Books & Ephemera at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 13 February.

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Links & Reviews

Here comes Bibliography Week! See the schedule of events.

- Coming up on 1–2 February, Rare Books Los Angeles, a new book fair organized by Brad & Jen Johnson. They were featured on the AbeBooks "Behind the Bookshelves" podcast this week.

- The BL's medieval manuscripts blog announces the library's acquisition of the Southwark Hours, now digitized and on display. The manuscript was formerly on loan from the Archdiocese of Southwark.

- A current exhibition at Les Enluminures in New York showcases the forgery collection of William Voelkle. A short Q&A between Sandra Hindman and Voelkle is up at Art and Object.

- Newly digitized from the Royal Society, five volumes of draft meeting minutes from 1686 to 1711.

- Over on the ABAA blog, some updates about the future of the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar.

- From Milton Esterow in the NYTimes, "The Hunt for the Nazi Loot Still Sitting on Library Shelves" (which partially highlights Anders Rydell's The Book Thieves).

- The Harvard Gazette has a look at the upcoming Houghton Library renovations.

- Jennifer Schuessler visited the Grolier Club for the NYTimes.

- Elizabeth Lisa Cruces is featured in the "Bright Young Librarians" column in FB&C.

- Jay Moschella has a post on the BPL blog about the library's recent digitization of two 15th-century Italian choirbooks.

- Rebecca Romney writes for LitHub about linguist Suzette Haden Elgin's 1984 novel Native Tongue.

Reviews

- Susan Orleans' The Library Book; review by Alexander Larman in the Guardian.

- Lee Israel's Can You Ever Forgive Me? (and the recent movie starring Melissa McCarthy); review by Kathryn Hughes in the Guardian.

Upcoming Auctions

- Rare Books & Fine Prints at William Bunch Auctions on 22 January.

- Books and Manuscripts at Il Ponte (Milan) on 22 January.

- Mexican Historical Books and Documents at Morton Subastas on 22 January.

- Autographed Documents, Manuscripts, Photos & Books at University Archives on 23 January.

- Rare Books & Works on Paper at Chiswick Auctions on 23 January.

- Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana at Sotheby's New York on 24 January.

- Mid-Winter Miscellany Part II, with Illustrated & Children's Books at PBA Galleries on 24 January.

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Links & Reviews

- From the "headlines that made me smile" department, in the Indy Star, "'The opposite of lost': IU Library claps back at The New Yorker over Sylvia Plath story." Unpublished, yes. Lost, no.

- Over at The Collation, Elizabeth DeBold on "Folger collections in times of war."

- From Leo Robson in the New Statesman, a piece on the "contested world of literary estates."

- Lindsay McKenzie reports for Inside Higher Ed on recent paper shortages and other issues that have bedeviled the production of many university press books and journals.

- Will Noel will give the 2019 Sandars Lectures in Bibliography at Cambridge in March, on "The Medieval Manuscript and Its Digital Image."

- Much news this week about a recent finding of lapis lazuli fragments in the tartar of a 10th-century German nun, most likely as the result of her working with the pigment while she was illuminating texts. See Steph Yin's NYTimes report or Sarah Zhang's Atlantic piece.

- Lloyd (Meadhbh) Houston writes for the TLS on the Bodleian Library's Phi Collection (of books deemed obscene or otherwise inappropriate).

- Cheap books were the order of the day for the Princeton Rare Book Working Group.

- From R. B. Bartgis at Sammelband, "Building and Displaying a Teaching Collection."

- The Bibliographical Society of Canada and Concordia University Press have announced a new book series: "Authors, Publishers, Readers, Texts: Studies in Book History and Print Culture."

Reviews

- Jill Lepore's These Truths; review by Christine DeLucia in the LARB.

- David Blight's Frederick Douglass; review by Adam Goodheart in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- "Say it Loud": The John Silverstein Collection of African American Social History at Heritage Auctions on 15 January.

- Printed Books, Holy Land Maps, Posters & Jewish Graphic Art at Kestenbaum & Company on 17 January (online).